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Working From Home? Here’s How You Can Separate ‘Home’ And ‘Work’

Working from home is incredible, right up until your cat spills water on your laptop, or your roommate starts listening to heavy metal on the speakers. With your neighbor whirring his power tools all day building his time machine, it’s only natural to feel like you’re just about spiraling out of control during the day.

Do you feel like working from home has left you somewhere in the middle between house chores and actual office work? Millions of Americans are a part of an unprecedented experiment in working from home because of Coronavirus. Although working from home has made many people happier, more efficient, and brought flexibility to their lives, the challenge to keep work and home separate still remains. With no one watching, there is no peer pressure and no communal obligations to get the job done.

Here are 5 tips that can help you achieve a work-home balance.

Start early

Having a schedule and starting your day early is like setting the path right for a productive day. Did you know that you would gain 15 days in a year if you woke up an hour early each morning?

“It is well to be up before daybreak, for such habits contribute to health, wealth, and wisdom.” – Aristotle

Setting aside time in the morning helps you focus, clears brain fog, and gives you time to eat a healthy breakfast, which will make you more efficient. You can channel your fresh energy into action and avoid the long commute to your office.

Choose a workspace

Just because you are not working at the office does not mean that you cannot have an office at home. Make sure to separate the leisure items and spaces from your work items. Your bedroom and couch should not get tangled with work – they are your personal spaces. Go to a table and chair for work or work on building your own home office. Make sure that your roommates and family members are aware of your working spot.

The luxury of one distraction

Chatty co-workers in the office luring you away from work with lunch invitations and casual talk. Who said that working in the office offers no distractions? Yet, you’re used to dealing with it. Similarly, allow yourself one distraction at home. It can be your pet, your kids, or even cooking meals. Anticipate your distractions, and you’ll be better at getting back to work with full focus.

Communicate expectations with people at home

You’re likely to have company at home. Roommates, spouses, siblings, and parents need to know that you’re at work when you sit at your designated working spot at home. It could be your presence at your “office table” or a closed-door to convey that you are busy.

Manage chores

With you, your chores, roommates/family, and a full-time job all under one roof, we know how annoying it is to juggle everything. One effective way is to ‘block time.’ Set aside a particular time before or after your job to finish big chores like washing the dishes, cooking, and sweeping. During your breaks, you can load/unload the washing machine, do a 5 minute declutter, or wipe down the kitchen/table counter. Giving yourself little tasks during breaks is a way to feel rewarded and is better than hitting your bed.

Do you like working from home? Tell us in the comment section below!